Beautiful Great Blue Herons – The Eyes Have It (Quirky Artist Stories Nbr 17)

Suddenly one recent Thursday morning, I lost vision in my left eye.

© 2017 Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron on a Pedestal – babsjeheron

Retina surgery went well. Before the operation I could not see two fingers if wiggled in front of my left eye and now after last Thursday’s surgery I can.

Remarkable job by my surgeon. Still a ways to go but I’m pleased as you can imagine.

Before the surgery I could not even see the eye chart on the wall much less read it. Now I can see the eye chart, still can’t read it but that may come with time.

Take care of your eyes, people.

And reach out if you (or a loved one) need an excellent retina surgeon in eastern Massachusetts.

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.Thanks again to Paula for her recent Thursday’s Special: Rift photo prompt. There is a rift between my left eye and right eye.

Thanks to Cee for her Hunt for joy.

This post is dedicated to the Lens Artist ladies (Tina, Amy, Patti, and Leya) and to Cee Neuner and Paula, all of whom encourage and inspire. Welcome back, Paula.

This week, the Lens Artists focus on negative space. There was definitely negative space where the vision in my left eye should have been.

From Patti Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 114: Negative Space .
From Tina Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 114: Negative Space .
From Amy Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 114: Negative Space .
From Leya Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 114: Negative Space .

Thanks to Cee for her Hunt for joy.
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From December 4 through January 28, 2020, my Great Blue Heron photographs were once again on display on the walls of the lobby and theater in a free one-woman show at the Summer Street Gallery, of The Center for Arts in Natick.

Many of the photos in the exhibit were shown for the first time, and do not appear on the blog. As always, many of the photos were taken on the waterways of the Charles River watershed.
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Thanks to Erica V and WordPress for the recent WPC: Place in the World. My favorite place is where the Herons are, of course it is. And the Herons? Their place is near the water, but also on the gallery walls and my blog. How else can I share them with you?

Thanks also to Ben H and WordPress for their WPC Challenge: Liquid. The Herons are drawn to water, as am I.
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During September and October, 2018, the Great Blue Herons were featured on the walls of the Natick Town Hall, located at 13 East Central Street in Natick, MA.
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Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2020 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, TCAN, Five Crows, Natick
Read the rest of this entry

Beautiful Great Blue Heron’s Alluring Lure (Not Art Nbr 25)

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron Fishes with Feather – babsjeheron

A recent news piece about dolphins using tools to catch fish brought to mind first-hand experience witnessing Great Blue Herons fishing with tools of their own.

At first, the Heron brandishing a feather in the top photo in this post looked playful, but then I realized the seagull feather was not a mere toy to this Great Blue Heron – it was a tool, a fishing lure she repeatedly dipped into the water to entice fishes up to the surface, making it easier for her to spear them with her stiletto beak.

Transfixed, I watched her repeat this for more than ten minutes. It looked almost ritualistic – totemic or shamanic even – to see a feathered creature brandishing a feather from a different bird in such repetitive behavior.

And then it dawned on me.

Before she first picked up the feather, she had been fishing, staring intently into the water as though tracking a fish, from the half-submerged pine trunk.

And once she picked up the feather, she continued her fishing – using the feather as bait to attract her prey, the fish.

How smart a bird and how alluring a lure she chose.

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This post is dedicated to the Lens Artist ladies (Tina, Amy, Patti, and Leya) and to Cee Neuner, all of whom encourage and inspire.

This week, the Lens Artists focus on Surprise. What a surprise it was to realize the Heron was using that feather as a fishing lure.

From Patti Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 103: Surprise .
From Tina Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 103: Surprise .
From Amy Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 103: Surprise .
From Leya Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 103: Surprise .

Thanks to Cee for her Hunt for joy.
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From December 4 through January 28, 2020, my Great Blue Heron photographs were once again on display on the walls of the lobby and theater in a free one-woman show at the Summer Street Gallery, of The Center for Arts in Natick.

Many of the photos in the exhibit were shown for the first time, and do not appear on the blog. As always, many of the photos were taken on the waterways of the Charles River watershed.
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Thanks to Erica V and WordPress for the recent WPC: Place in the World. My favorite place is where the Herons are, of course it is. And the Herons? Their place is near the water, but also on the gallery walls and my blog. How else can I share them with you?

Thanks also to Ben H and WordPress for their WPC Challenge: Liquid. The Herons are drawn to water, as am I.
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During September and October, 2018, the Great Blue Herons were featured on the walls of the Natick Town Hall, located at 13 East Central Street in Natick, MA.
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Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2020 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, TCAN, Five Crows, Natick
Read the rest of this entry

Beautiful Great Blue Herons Simply Unretouched

What a moment of joy when a photograph downloads from the camera exactly as hoped.

Babsje

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron diving beneath the surface.

What photographer hasn’t experienced that moment of joy and surprise when a photo comes out exactly as hoped for, no digital magic needed or wanted. The photo is complete as-is, in and of itself. It was an exciting surprise to see the golden-hour sun backlighting water bubbles splashing high above the Great Blue Heron as she dove beneath the surface. Experiences like that are perfect fodder for Cee’s Hunt for Joy challenges.

Readers of this blog know I’m both fine art photographer and nature photographer, but I’m also a photojournalist, a stringer for a national newspaper syndicate. The rules are vastly different for fine art and photojournalism. In journalism, no editing is permitted, not even a single pixel can be adjusted, and often times even cropping is not allowed. For fine art, sometimes it seems the opposite is expected – what makes it ‘Art’ is the artist-photographer’s manipulation of the image.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron preening Columbus Day weekend.

The three photos shown here today have not been edited, each came out of the camera as shown. Chronologically, the middle photo of the Great Blue Heron preening was captured first; followed by the top photo of the same Heron ducking beneath the surface in hopes of landing a fish, followed by the third shot of the exultant Heron making off with a huge Pike. If that sequence isn’t the embodiment of Cee’s Hunt for Joy concept, I don’t know what is.

Great blue heron lands a large fish.

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Thanks to Ben H and WordPress for their new April Discover Prompts series. Like many others, I have been missing the WordPress challenges. Today, the topic is Discover Prompts: Light . The backlit bubbles were not retouched. The photo came right out of the camera like that..

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This post is dedicated to the Lens Artist ladies (Tina, Amy, Patti, and Leya) and to Cee Neuner, all of whom encourage and inspire.

This week, the Lens Artists focus on Simplicity. The three Heron photos embody simplicity – no editing, straight from the camera. The simplest of work-flows. WYSIWYG

From Patti Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 91: Simplicity .
From Tina Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 91: Simplicity .
From Amy Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 91: Simplicity .
From Leya Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 91: Simplicity .

Thanks to Cee for her Hunt for joy.
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From December 4 through January 28, 2020, my Great Blue Heron photographs were once again on display on the walls of the lobby and theater in a free one-woman show at the Summer Street Gallery, of The Center for Arts in Natick.

Many of the photos in the exhibit were shown for the first time, and do not appear on the blog. As always, many of the photos were taken on the waterways of the Charles River watershed.
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Thanks to Erica V and WordPress for the recent WPC: Place in the World. My favorite place is where the Herons are, of course it is. And the Herons? Their place is near the water, but also on the gallery walls and my blog. How else can I share them with you?

Thanks also to Ben H and WordPress for their WPC Challenge: Liquid. The Herons are drawn to water, as am I.
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During September and October, 2018, the Great Blue Herons were featured on the walls of the Natick Town Hall, located at 13 East Central Street in Natick, MA.
.

Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2020 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, TCAN, Five Crows, Natick
Read the rest of this entry

Beautiful Great Blue Heron En Plein Air Painting at the Charles River

She wasn’t out for blood; she was out for solitude. Any morning when a heron wins its skirmish and achieves solitude is a good morning for a heron. And solitude is what I crave in the mornings, too.

Breakfast at the Lake,
Babsje

© 2020 Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

En Plein Air Painting at the Dam Nbr 1 – babsjeheron

Wildlife is shy and fast and elusive and unpredictable – Great Blue Herons especially so. They usually erupt into flight at the first sensing of an approaching human.

I am shy by nature and photography is a solitary endeavor for me. I don’t join outings by birders, I don’t do camera club trips, and I don’t go on Audubon excursions, as wonderful as they all may be. I don’t even take friends canoeing or kayaking any more. (I did that twice and both times they talked too much and too loudly and scared off the Herons.) I steer clear of other boats on the water to keep a good distance away because, after all, even the fishermen need and deserve their space.

So, imagine my dismay upon arriving at the Charles River dam that morning to see a big splash of color looming over the ancient grinding wheel across from the fish ladder. There would be no Great Blue Herons that day.

Taking in the entire scene, though, dismay quickly turned to joy.

What came into view was first one, then two, then three, then four artists set up in 19th century vignettes with easels under brightly-colored umbrellas. They were spaced a good distance from each other, all with a differing vantage point of the river and dam and old stone bridge where the Herons fish.

One of the painters in particular called to mind a scene from the mid-1800s as she gazed out over the lush water lilies floating above the dam, paints at the ready, paintbrush in hand.

The bridge in this photo below was constructed in the mid-19th century, around the same time that the cyanotype process came into vogue. There is a palpable timelessness to this location and the artists and easels enhanced that feeling. I can easily imagine a 19th century painter or photographer capturing an ancestor of one of the Great Blue Herons that frequent the area today.

© 2016 Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron – Charles River Blues Nbr 2 – In the Cyanotype Style – babsjeheron

I chose this 19th century style cyanoprint series “Charles River Blues” for one of my exhibits at TCAN because the Summer Street Gallery, itself, is from that same 19th century period.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Charles River Blues Great Blue Herons at TCAN May thru July 10 2018 – babsjeheron

© 2020 Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

En Plein Air Painting at the Dam Nbr 2 – babsjeheron

The fish ladder with artist, above. I would have loved to see what her painting looked like.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron and Fish Ladder- babsjeheron

There are many schools of painting. Some artists paint on location, en plein air, some in a studio. Some paint stunningly realistic scenes and some fantastic figments of their own imagining. Some artists take a snapshot out in the world and then paint from the photo instead of from life.

Is it cheating to paint a landscape from a photograph of a scene?

What do you think?
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Rosemary Morelli teaches painting including en plain air style at her studio in eastern Massachusetts. The artists painting at the dam that day were a few of her students.

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This post is dedicated to the Lens Artist ladies (Tina, Amy, Patti, and Leya) and to Cee Neuner, all of whom encourage and inspire.

This week, the Lens Artists focus on Distance.

From Patti Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 90: Distance .
From Tina Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 90: Distance .
From Amy Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 90: Distance .
From Leya Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 90: Distance .

Last week, the Lens Artists focused on A River Runs Through It. I hope they forgive me for a second submission.

From Patti Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 89: A River Runs Through the City.
From Tina Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 89: River .
From Amy Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 89: A River Runs Through It .
From Leya Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 89: A River Runs Through It .

Thanks to Cee for her Hunt for joy.
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From December 4 through January 28, 2020, my Great Blue Heron photographs were once again on display on the walls of the lobby and theater in a free one-woman show at the Summer Street Gallery, of The Center for Arts in Natick.

Many of the photos in the exhibit were shown for the first time, and do not appear on the blog. As always, many of the photos were taken on the waterways of the Charles River watershed.
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Thanks to Erica V and WordPress for the recent WPC: Place in the World. My favorite place is where the Herons are, of course it is. And the Herons? Their place is near the water, but also on the gallery walls and my blog. How else can I share them with you?

Thanks also to Ben H and WordPress for their WPC Challenge: Liquid. The Herons are drawn to water, as am I.
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During September and October, 2018, the Great Blue Herons were featured on the walls of the Natick Town Hall, located at 13 East Central Street in Natick, MA.
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Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2020 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, TCAN, Five Crows, Natick
Read the rest of this entry

Beautiful Great Blue Heron in the Charles River

The Charles River is a land of contrasts.

Babsje

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron poised in the Charles River.

Sometimes a person can love a book, but not the movie treatment. Sometimes it’s the opposite – you really enjoy a film and then read the book, and the book falls flat.

I enjoyed Bill Bryson’s book about the Appalachian Trail, “A Walk in the Woods’ more than the movie. I KonMari’d my bookshelves a couple of years ago and kept all of Bill Bryson’s books. (Even though I have a Kindle PaperWhite e-reader.)

This week’s Lens Artist prompt is “A River Runs Through It.” I first read the novel, actually three short stories by Norman Maclean, many years ago. When I KonMari’d my bookshelves, “A River Runs Through It” is another one I kept.
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The Great Blue Heron shown at the top of this post stands in a small cove just around the corner from this next tableau staged on a point jutting into the Charles River.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Charles River tableau as seen from a kayak.

The property teems with whimsical statuary, including an alligator crouching on the shore, an iguana perched on an overhanging branch, a black bear rearing up on hind legs (with cub underfoot), a family of three white-tailed deer, a giant Galapagos tortoise, and more.

And no, the Great Blue Heron isn’t one of the life-like statues – but I wouldn’t be surprised if one day a Heron statue was added to the menagerie.

Alligator on the shore of the Charles River.

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Coming back around to books vs films, I’ve never seen the movie of “A River Runs Through It.”with that famous actor, though. Should I?
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This post is dedicated to the Lens Artist ladies (Tina, Amy, Patti, and Leya) and to Cee Neuner, all of whom encourage and inspire.

This week, the Lens Artists focus on Rivers.

From Patti Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 89: A River Runs Through the City.
From Tina Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 89: River .
From Amy Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 89: A River Runs Through It .
From Leya Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 89: A River Runs Through It .

Thanks to Cee for her Pick a Topic: Landscape.

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From December 4 through January 28, 2020, my Great Blue Heron photographs were once again on display on the walls of the lobby and theater in a free one-woman show at the Summer Street Gallery, of The Center for Arts in Natick.

Many of the photos in the exhibit were shown for the first time, and do not appear on the blog. As always, many of the photos were taken on the waterways of the Charles River watershed.
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Thanks to Erica V and WordPress for the recent WPC: Place in the World. My favorite place is where the Herons are, of course it is. And the Herons? Their place is near the water, but also on the gallery walls and my blog. How else can I share them with you?

Thanks also to Ben H and WordPress for their WPC Challenge: Liquid. The Herons are drawn to water, as am I.
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During September and October, 2018, the Great Blue Herons were featured on the walls of the Natick Town Hall, located at 13 East Central Street in Natick, MA.
.

Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2020 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, TCAN, Five Crows, Newton
Read the rest of this entry

Beautiful Great Blue Herons – And There I Was Without a Camera (Quirky Artist Stories Nbr 15)

Every photographer has at least one story of the one that got away.

Babsje

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron yearling fishing in the reeds.

Like every fisherman worth his salt, every photographer has a tale of the photo that got away. Maybe the perfect subject got photobombed by an interloper. Maybe the wildlife dashed out of frame, leaving only the proverbial butt-shot. Maybe the batteries ran out of juice. Maybe the camera ran out of film (anyone remember film?). And maybe the camera had been left behind at home.

The last time I saw a Great Blue Heron was from the window of a moving taxicab. It was a stereotypical late October New England day, warm sunshine glinting on gorgeous autumn foliage. The Heron stood stock-still in the marshy reeds on the riverbank, staring intently into the slow-moving water mere yards from the busy road. Golden-hour sun bathed the shore lined with reeds and cast warming tones on his grey-blue feathers. The Heron would have made a lovely portrait, but there I was without a camera in a moving car.

The scene lasted for only a few moments as the cab whizzed by at 45mph, but it remains indelibly etched in my mind. And now, every time I pass that river, I make a point of scanning for the Heron.

Sometimes when the camera has been left behind entirely, what remains is a glorious photo-memory in our mind’s eye. There are worse things.

I’d love to read your own stories of the one that got away.
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This post is dedicated to the Lens Artist ladies (Tina, Amy, Patti, and Leya) and to Cee Neuner, all of whom encourage and inspire.

This week, the Lens Artists focus on gorgeous photos with reflections. I took the word reflections in a different direction, reflecting on the one that got away.

From Patti Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 87: Reflections.
From Tina Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 87: Reflections .
From Amy Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 87: Reflections .
From Leya Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 87: Reflections.

Thanks to Cee for her Hunt for Joy Challenge.

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From December 4 through January 28, 2020, my Great Blue Heron photographs were once again on display on the walls of the lobby and theater in a free one-woman show at the Summer Street Gallery, of The Center for Arts in Natick.

Many of the photos in the exhibit were shown for the first time, and do not appear on the blog. As always, many of the photos were taken on the waterways of the Charles River watershed.
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Thanks to Erica V and WordPress for the recent WPC: Place in the World. My favorite place is where the Herons are, of course it is. And the Herons? Their place is near the water, but also on the gallery walls and my blog. How else can I share them with you?

Thanks also to Ben H and WordPress for their WPC Challenge: Liquid. The Herons are drawn to water, as am I.
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During September and October, 2018, the Great Blue Herons were featured on the walls of the Natick Town Hall, located at 13 East Central Street in Natick, MA.
.

Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2020 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, TCAN, Five Crows, Natick, Wayland
Read the rest of this entry

Beautiful Great Blue Herons – Your Favorite Photos and Egg on my Face

The thing is to be attentively present. 
To sit and wait is as important as to move.
Patience is as valuable as industry.
What is to be known is always there.
When it reveals itself to you, or when you come upon it, it is by chance.
The only condition is your being there and being watchful.

Wendell Berry
The Long-Legged House

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron at Keyhole Tunnel – babsjeheron

This week, the Lens Artists’ challenge topic is ‘Narrow.’ The tunnel shown here is barely wider than the length of my paddle. Sometimes, 1 can only maneuver my paddle at an awkward angle, stroking with only one blade in the water if the level in the lake has risen due to rainfall.

In the aftermath of tropical storm Irene a few years ago, one day I encountered three other kayakers in line to paddle through single-file. One after another, they each nosed into the tunnel but quickly failed to progress forward more than a couple of feet.

*Rookies,” I thought to myself, and made a move to show them how it is done. However, the water level was so much higher and the current so much stronger than usual that I was able to enter the tunnel only about five feet before the swiftly rushing water spit my boat out backwards into the cove. So much for showing those other kayakers how to navigate the tunnel. Boy did I have egg on my face. (Only belatedly did I learn that the huge current resulted from opening flood gates to control waters in the reservoir system serving the city.)

A few weeks ago, I invited readers to vote on their favorite Great Blue Heron photos. If you missed that post, it’s not too late to participate. Click here and share your opinion..

Spoiler alert: The photo of the fledgling Great Blue Heron shown in today’s post won the vote. Here are the results:

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Reader’s Favorite Heron Poll Results

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Thanks to Cee for her B&W Challenge: Moving Water. .

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Once more, thanks and kudos to the inspiring Lens Artists – Patti, Tina, Amy, and Leya – for their continuing devotion to elevating and celebrating photography.

From Patti Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 84: Narrow.
From Tina Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 84: Narrow.
From Amy Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 84: Narrow.
From Leya Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 84: Narrow.

From December 4 through January 28, 2020, my Great Blue Heron photographs were once again on display on the walls of the lobby and theater in a free one-woman show at the Summer Street Gallery, of The Center for Arts in Natick.

Many of the photos in the exhibit are being shown for the first time, and do not appear on the blog. As always, many of the photos were taken on the waterways of the Charles River watershed.
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Thanks to Erica V and WordPress for the recent WPC: Place in the World. My favorite place is where the Herons are, of course it is. And the Herons? Their place is near the water, but also on the gallery walls and my blog. How else can I share them with you?

Thanks also to Ben H and WordPress for their WPC Challenge: Liquid. The Herons are drawn to water, as am I.
.

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During September and October, 2018, the Great Blue Herons were featured on the walls of the Natick Town Hall, located at 13 East Central Street in Natick, MA.
.

Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2020 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, TCAN, Five Crows, Natick, Wayland
Read the rest of this entry

Great Blue Heron On Litter Patrol (Not Art Nbr 24)

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron holding a huge plastic bag she pulled from the muck along the shore.

Her fishing technique that day was unlike anything I’d witnessed before: she poked and prodded the muck along the south end of the cove for at least half an hour. Her trophy? This huge plastic bag. At one time, it contained something large, larger than a king-sized pillow to be sure.

© 2017 Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Herons with Litter – babsjeheron

The young male had been intently watching the female from yards away down the cove while she was trying to pull the bag free, and he rapidly made a beeline towards that patch of shoreline. He had tried so valiantly that autumn to seduce the older female heron. Was this his chance?

I’m not sure if he was more interested in pursuing her as a mate or in wresting the huge plastic bag from her.

© 2017 Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Carrying Huge Plastic Bag – babsjeheron

Whichever was his intention, she was having none of it. She pivoted on her heels and flew westward out of the cove with the bag trailing from her beak, leaving the young male behind.

Young great blue heron.

Still in a courtship posture, the young male looks on dejectedly after the female fled the cove.
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I wish I could say that the female was carrying the bag voluntarily, but I cannot: the plastic was hooked securely on her lower bill.

I quickly paddled out of the cove, hoping to follow her and ensure that she freed herself from the bag. Under the shade of tall pines, she shook and shook her head from side-to-side the way a dog shakes a rag.

To no avail.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron’s Trash Bag – babsjeheron

More than three weeks later, I found the plastic trash bag floating and retrieved it. Here it is on the ground next to my boat for scale. The boat is 15 feet long. As you can see, that plastic bag was nearly half the length of the boat.
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And what of the two Great Blue Herons?

They both survived migration that year and returned in the spring and successfully nested.

I like happy endings.
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From December 4 through January 28, 2020, my Great Blue Heron photographs are once again on display on the walls of the lobby and theater in a free one-woman show at the Summer Street Gallery, of The Center for Arts in Natick.

If you’re in the Boston or Metro West area, please stop by to see the Great Blue Herons. Many of the photos in the exhibit are being shown for the first time, and do not appear on the blog. As always, many of the photos were taken on the waterways of the Charles River watershed.

The gallery is open whenever the box office is open, so please check hours here.

And who knows, maybe I’ll see you there one day.

I’d like that.

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Thanks to Cee for her On the Hunt for Joy Challenge. I jumped for joy when I saw proof the female had broken free of the plastic bag stuck on her bill.

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Debbie’s One Word Sunday’s prompt asks for posts about Plastics . Plastic bag pollution is insidious and Debbie’s post has an important message.

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Once more, thanks and kudos to the inspiring Lens Artists – Patti, Tina, Amy, and Leya – for their continuing devotion to elevating and celebrating photography.
From Patti Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 81: Find Something Red.
From Tina Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 81: Seeing Red.
From Amy Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 81: Find Something Red.
From Leya Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 81: Find Something Red.

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Thanks to Erica V and WordPress for the recent WPC: Place in the World. My favorite place is where the Herons are, of course it is. And the Herons? Their place is near the water, but also on the gallery walls and my blog. How else can I share them with you?

Thanks also to Ben H and WordPress for their WPC Challenge: Liquid. The Herons are drawn to water, as am I.
.

.
During September and October, 2018, the Great Blue Herons were featured on the walls of the Natick Town Hall, located at 13 East Central Street in Natick, MA.
.

Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2020 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, TCAN, Five Crows, Natick, Wayland
Read the rest of this entry

Favorite Great Blue Herons in Black and White

… Suddenly I realize
That if I stepped out of my body I would break
Into flight.

With apologies to James Wright’s poem “A Blessing”
The Branch Will not Break

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron Catching Large Fish – babsjeheron

The fabulous ladies of Lens Artistry recently asked about our favorite photos posted in 2019. As an artist I do have personal favorites, but I’m more curious about what YOU, the readers, appreciate – enough about me!

After the photos, there’s a poll where you can let me know which are your favorites. It’s been two years since I’ve done a poll, and I do hope you participate. I’m looking forward to seeing your responses.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron at Keyhole Tunnel – babsjeheron

© 2016 Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron Garbo Pose – bw – babsjeheron

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Wherein the Great Blue Heron Sticks his Landing – babsjeheron

Accidental double exposure of a great blue heron fishing in the waterfall – babsjeheron

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Number 25 B&W – babsjeheron

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From December 4 through January 28, 2020, my Great Blue Heron photographs are once again on display on the walls of the lobby and theater in a free one-woman show at the Summer Street Gallery, of The Center for Arts in Natick.

If you’re in the Boston or Metro West area, please stop by to see the Great Blue Herons. Many of the photos in the exhibit are being shown for the first time, and do not appear on the blog. As always, many of the photos were taken on the waterways of the Charles River watershed.

The gallery is open whenever the box office is open, so please check hours here.

And who knows, maybe I’ll see you there one day.

I’d like that.

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Thanks to Cee for her B&W Challenge: Moving Water. .

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Once more, thanks and kudos to the inspiring Lens Artists – Patti, Tina, Amy, and Leya – for their continuing devotion to elevating and celebrating photography.
From Patti Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 77: Favorite Photos.
From Tina Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 77: Favorite Images of 2019.
From Amy Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 77: Favorite Photos of 2019<.
From Leya Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 77: Favorite Photos of 2019.

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Thanks to Erica V and WordPress for the recent WPC: Place in the World. My favorite place is where the Herons are, of course it is. And the Herons? Their place is near the water, but also on the gallery walls and my blog. How else can I share them with you?

Thanks also to Ben H and WordPress for their WPC Challenge: Liquid. The Herons are drawn to water, as am I.
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During September and October, 2018, the Great Blue Herons were featured on the walls of the Natick Town Hall, located at 13 East Central Street in Natick, MA.
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Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2020 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, TCAN, Five Crows, Natick, Wayland
Read the rest of this entry

The Great Blue Herons’ Favorite Cove

The artist’s job is to get the audience to care about your obsessions.

Martin Scorsese

© 2016 Babsje All. rights reserved. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron in the cove, foraging.

Many of my photos are taken from the waters of the Charles River Watershed area. Moments of absolute stillness and peace are to be found there on the water. Sometimes there’s a touch of quirky humor in captures just for fun. Sometimes the photos I take are capital A art, other times merely nature photos from the field.

Whatever the case, there’s always the love and concern for the herons I’ve come to know over the years.

The six photos today were all taken in the same secluded cove over the years. Any favorite cove of the Great Blue Herons is a special spot for me.


This photo is a variation of an earlier theme of mine: Great Blue Herons with Pickerel Weed. For two days in a row, I witnessed this beautiful Great Blue Heron at the far end of the cove. He preened, and slept, and preened and slept some more, for hours both days. Click here for Beautiful Great Blue Heron Sweetly Preens.
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You may think the Heron in this photo is the same Heron shown directly above, but you would be mistaken. The location in the cove is the same, but the photos were taken 10 days apart, and the Herons are different, they are a mated pair. It is fascinating to watch the pair jockey for position on that half-submerged tree: the male lays territorial claim there, and chases the female away.
Click here for Beautiful Great Blue Heron Sticks the Landing Nbr 2.
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This Great Blue Heron is in the habit of following the sunlight as it moves across the cove, much the way a cat will seek out puddles of sun indoors. Click here for Great Blue Heron in Autumn Nbr 2.
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One spring, before the Pickerel Weed in the foreground and the yellow flowers sprouted up, a pair of Mute Swans built a large nest on this patch of shoreline. Once their cygnets fledged and the nest abandoned, nature and Herons reclaimed the shore, leaving no trace. Click here for Beautiful Great Blue Heron Along the Shore.


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This photo is one of the ones that got me started photographing Great Blue Herons from the water. Click here for Wings Akimbo.
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From December 4 through January 25, 2020, my Great Blue Heron photographs are once again on display on the walls of the lobby and theater in a free one-woman show at the Summer Street Gallery, of The Center for Arts in Natick.

If you’re in the Boston or Metro West area, please stop by to see the Great Blue Herons. Many of the photos in the exhibit are being shown for the first time, and do not appear on the blog. As always, many of the photos were taken on the waterways of the Charles River watershed.

The gallery is open whenever the box office is open, so please check hours here.

And who knows, maybe I’ll see you there one day.

I’d like that.

Thanks to Cee for her soon-to-come On the Hunt for Joy Challenge. The Herons, themselves, are an embodiment of joy.

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Debbie’s Six Word Saturday’s prompt asks for posts with six words in the title Rudolph Takes a Rest . Following the rules for a change, this post has exactly six words in the title.

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Again, thanks and kudos to the inspiring Lens Artists – Patti, Tina, Amy, and Leya – for their continuing devotion to elevating and celebrating photography.
From Patti Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 77: Favorite Photos.
From Tina Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 78: Special Spot.
From Amy Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 78: Special Spot.
From Leya Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 78: Special Spot.

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.
Thanks to Erica V and WordPress for the recent WPC: Place in the World. My favorite place is where the Herons are, of course it is. And the Herons? Their place is near the water, but also on the gallery walls and my blog. How else can I share them with you?

Thanks also to Ben H and WordPress for their WPC Challenge: Liquid. The Herons are drawn to water, as am I.
.

.
During September and October, 2018, the Great Blue Herons were featured on the walls of the Natick Town Hall, located at 13 East Central Street in Natick, MA.
.

Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2020 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, TCAN, Five Crows, Natick, Wayland
Read the rest of this entry

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