Beautiful Great Blue Herons – A Retrospective, Nbr 1

The artist’s job is to get the audience to care about your obsessions.

Martin Scorsese

Frequent visitors to this blog know that most of my photos are taken from the waters of the Charles River Watershed area. There are moments of absolute stillness and peace there on the water, and mindful moments imbued with wonder. There’s love and concern for the herons I’ve come to know over the years. Sometimes there’s a touch of humor, and other times a sense of curiosity and a wanting to learn more. Sometimes the photos I take are capital A art, other times merely nature photos from the field. Some of the stories below are personal anecdotes about encounters with Great Blue Herons, some have more scientific value than others, such as the Great Blue Heron using a twig as a tool. Some have more artistic merit than others and some are quirky and just for fun.

Crows are the master tool users of the bird world, but as this first-hand experience shows, herons are smart birds, too. In this sequence showing tool use by herons, the yearling Great Blue Heron wiggles a twig in the water to attract the fish. Click here for Who You Calling a Birdbrain?.
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The small heron turned back and forth, from alpha heron to human, weighing, weighing the greater of the dangers, the lesser of the evils: alpha heron vs woman. And then he made his move. Click here for The Lesser of Evils.
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It is not so rare to see a human in the cove, and there’s one who sometimes watches me when I’m down at the end, where its more brook than cove. You know the place. She thinks I’m not aware of her presence, but I am. I just let her think that. Click here for Brown Bag Lunch in the Cove.
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It took them quite a while to position the branch, and there  were a few cliffhanger moments as the branch nearly escaped their beaks’ grasp and almost plummets to the island floor 70 feet below. Click here for Our Love must be Some Kind of Blind Love.
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Fearlessly, fleet of wing and nimble of foot, he practiced take offs and landings from the tip of that branch. My heart was in my throat as I watched, because it was such a long way down and he was still a beginner. And his nest mate? I imagined him thinking, “My turn, I want my turn now!” Click here for Fleet of Wing, Nimble of Foot.
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Thanks to Jen H and WordPress for this week’s WPC Challenge: Twisted. The Herons building their nest twisted and turned almost acrobatically as they attempted to position that exceptionally long branch into their nest.

Thanks to Cee N and WordPress for her SYW Challenge: Share Your World May 28 2018. The Herons, themselves, obliquely answer some of Cee’s thoughtful questions for this week. And my answer to her question about my choice of vacation spot? My beloved lake. (And apologies to Cee for once again bending the rules.)

Thanks again to Erica V and WordPress for thei recent WPC: Place in the World. My favorite place in the world is on the water with the beloved Great Blue Herons.
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From May 1 through July 11, 2018, my Great Blue Heron photographs once again grace the walls of the lobby and theater in a free one-woman show at the Summer Street Gallery, of The Center for Arts in Natick. If you’re in the Boston or Metro West area, please stop by to see the Great Blue Herons. As always, many of the photos were taken on the waterways of the Charles River watershed. The gallery is open whenever the box office is open, so please check hours here.
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Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2018 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, Kayaking, TCAN, Five Crows

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Posted on May 28, 2018, in ardea herodias, Great Blue Heron, Nature, Photo Essay, Photography, Photography challenge, postaday, Weekly Challenge, Weekly Photo Challenge, Wildlife Photography and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 7 Comments.

  1. Knappe foto’s en fijne info

  2. I’ve moved to a place where I see Herons fly by the creek occasionally. Pure heaven! Wish I could get to see your exhibit, but time and distance… 🙂

    • You’re fortunate to see the Herons by your creek. The weather here has been a rollercoaster and when time permits and weather permits I’m hoping to see some, myself. In the meantime, the nightly chorus from the Great Horned Owls is fascinating. I hear them but have yet to see them, much yet capture with a camera: they are so elusive. Best, Babsje

  3. You can bend the rules anytime you want. 😀

  1. Pingback: Twisted – Rosebud | What's (in) the Picture?

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