Beautiful Great Blue Herons – A Retrospective, Nbr 3

People who know me know my motto:

“Walk softly and carry a long lens™”

Babsje

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron Yearling Number 2 – babsjeheron

I learned long ago to open myself, and my eyes and camera, to whatever experiences and sights the waters bring forth at any moment. My emotions have run the gamut from excitement, to apprehension, to alarm, to amazement, to curiosity, to anxiety, to happiness, and (thankfully very rarely) to sadness. Close readers of this blog are aware of the protectiveness I feel towards the Great Blue Herons. The stories in this retrospective post all have happy endings. I like happy endings.

Once again, many thanks to the creative team at WordPress who have made it possible to share the Great Blue Herons here over the past 5 years.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron Fledgling

Close to the island, I found no crumpled birds littering the island floor, no sodden nestlings floating in the waters nearby.

Click here for Freshly Fledged
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© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Hot Time at the Boathouse

And what the taxi driver told me next made the hair stand up on the back of my neck… That day, he came across a great blue heron caught in fishing line on one of the pine logs. The line was caught in the heron’s wing and foot, and the heron was struggling but obviously very weakened by the time he got there.

Click here for The Taxi Driver’s Tale
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© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Fishing with A Feather

Doesn’t this Great Blue Heron holding a seagull feather bring to mind a friendly dog playfully carrying his favorite toy back to you? At the time, I wanted to say to her, “Who’s a good girl? You are! You are a good girl!” because the way she pranced the length of the submerged log seemed so playful – at first. And then I realized it was another case of tool use by Herons.

Click here for Who’s a good Great Blue Heron?
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© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron Yearling

There was reason to be concerned for the newly-fledged herons. Would they survive the migration south, the winter, and the migration back? If so, would they remember this lake where they were born and make it their home once again?

Click here for Full Circle: Freshly Fledged
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© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron Meditation

I heard them – boisterous and happy – before I felt their wake, and I felt their wake before I saw them, and when I saw them the first thing I saw was the captain’s over-size gang hat. And the second thing I saw was their telegraphed trajectory – heading straight for the small nesting island. There was no doubt about that, and no doubt that they would make landfall, and no doubt that the adult male would flee the nest and abandon the chicks.

Click here for Pequeño: Stranger in a Strange Land
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Thanks to Krista S and WordPress for last week’s final WPC: All Time Favorites. Many thanks to the creative team at WordPress who have made sharing the Great Blue Herons here over the past 5 years possible.

Thanks to Cee N and WordPress for her COB Photo Challenge: June 10 2018. Look closely at the set of five photos in this post. Do you see one that is not like the others? (And apologies to Cee for once again bending the rules.)

Thanks to Paula and WordPress for her Thursday’S Special: Pick A Word In June. The Fledgling Great Blue Heron is a ‘nascent’ GBH, freshly out of the nest.

Thanks again to Erica V and WordPress for the recent WPC: Place in the World. My favorite place in the world is on the water with the beloved Great Blue Herons.
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From May 1 through July 11, 2018, my Great Blue Heron photographs once again grace the walls of the lobby and theater in a free one-woman show at the Summer Street Gallery, of The Center for Arts in Natick. If you’re in the Boston or Metro West area, please stop by to see the Great Blue Herons. As always, many of the photos were taken on the waterways of the Charles River watershed. The gallery is open whenever the box office is open, so please check hours here.
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Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2018 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, Kayaking, TCAN, Five Crows

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Posted on June 10, 2018, in ardea herodias, Art, Cee's Odd Ball Challenge, daily prompt, Great Blue Heron, Nature, Photo Essay, postaday, Thursday's Special, Weekly Photo Challenge, Wildlife Photography and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 12 Comments.

  1. I have been absent a lot from my blog and not visiting as much as I would like these days. I had to stop by and see what you were up to. As usual, your pictures are amazing. I love your heron tales. They inspire me! When I ride the river, I see one and think of your blog. This year I am seeing many more along the mighty Mississippi here in the Quad Cities. We were biking the other day and there was a young one. He was a beauty. They usually fly away when we bike by but this one tolerated us as we rode by. I love when they fly overhead when I am biking the river.
    keep up your work educating us about their importance. The natural world needs us to keep her safe….so glad I stopped by today!

    • Hi Robbie – I, too, am glad you stopped by today. I always enjoy hearing about your own Heron sightings along the river on your bike, thanks for sharing them. The young one you saw probably had not yet learned to fear. They seem to not fully recognize fear of humans until they are a bit older. Looking forward to more posts from you on your blog. Your kale post still sticks in memory! Thanks for commenting again. Best, Babsje

  2. i always enjoy your posts. 😀 😀

  3. Geniet altijd van je reiger foto’s

  4. What wonderful photos, I love herons too, and birding in general. I look forward to exploring your blog and seeing your work.

  5. Bij ons zie waar je ook gaat overal reigers.

  6. Candid heron shots! I love them.

    • Thanks Paula! It’s good that you call them ‘candid’ Heron photos. Secretly, sometimes it feels like the Herons are intentionally striking poses on purpose! Best, Babsje

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