Beautiful Heron on the Charles River

Great Blue Heron poised in the Charles River - babsjeheron  © Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron poised in the Charles River – babsjeheron

The Charles River is a land of contrasts.

Babsje

Alligator on the shore of the Charles River - babsjeheron  © 2021 Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Alligator on the shore of the Charles River – babsjeheron

The Great Blue Heron shown at the top of this post stands in a small cove just around the corner on the Charles River from a property teeming with whimsical statuary.

There’s an Alligator crouching on the shore.

An Iguana perches on an overhanging branch.

A giant Galapagos Tortoise lumbers ploddingly ahead.

A family of three White Tail Deer munch noiselessly on tender greens.

Bear Along the Charles River in Autumn - babsjeheron © Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Bear Along the Charles River in Autumn – babsjeheron

An inquisitive Black Bear rears up on hind legs with her cub underfoot.

The whimsical menagerie greets boaters on a point jutting into the Charles River in Newton, Massachusetts.

And no, the Great Blue Heron shown in the top photo isn’t one of the fanciful life-like statues – it’s the real deal, but I wouldn’t be surprised if one day they added a Heron statue to the menagerie.

A large Bison stands guard next to a copper tub at the point of land.

The sign saying WATER ENJOY” is a welcome sight for thirsty kayakers and canoeists on hot summer days: the owners fill the copper tub with water bottles.

Charles River tableau as seen from a kayak - babsjeheron © Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Charles River tableau as seen from a kayak – babsjeheron

View Through a Tunnel on the Charles River in Autumn - babsjeheron © Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

View Through a Tunnel on the Charles River in Autumn – babsjeheron

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This post is prompted by Cee Neuner, Debbie Smyth, Dawn Miller, Jez Braithwaite, and the creative and inspiring Lens Artists Tina, Amy, Patti, and Leya, all of whom encourage the community of photographers and writers. Please click the links below to see the beautiful offerings from these wonderful photographers.

The focus for this week’s Lens Artist challenge hosted by Tina is “Interesting Architecture.” One of the libraries has very interesting architecture. In 1873, the Morse Institute Library was dedicated in a Gothic-style red brick building, made possible by the bequest of Mary Ann Morse.

Morse Institute Library Exterior - babsjeheron © Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Morse Institute Library Exterior – babsjeheron

By the 1980s the town’s needs had outgrown the existing building and groundbreaking on a new library building took place in 1995. The new library opened in 1997 and kept the 1873 red brick building as the southwest cornerstone of the new library. The above photo shows the original red brick library at left and abutting it at right you can see a short flight of steps leading to entrance doors.

From the inside, you can see the full brick shell of the 1873 building, along with the beautiful stained glass windows.

Notice the large windows at the center of the second floor in the above exterior photo. The photo below shows those same windows when viewed from inside the second floor of the library.

Morse Institute Library Interior Stained Glass Windows - babsjeheron © Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Morse Institute Library Interior Stained Glass Windows – babsjeheron

Similarly, here is the second floor interior view of the Henri Prunaret History Room. As you can see, the windows and brick and stone work are the same as shown on the exterior photo.

Morse Institute Library Interior Henri Prunaret History Room - babsjeheron © Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Morse Institute Library Interior Henri Prunaret History Room – babsjeheron

The new library meets the old library using this walkway from the Reference Desk area into the History Room:

Morse Institute Library Interior Walkway to Henri Prunaret History Room - babsjeheron © Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Morse Institute Library Interior Walkway to Henri Prunaret History Room – babsjeheron

Morse Institute Library Interior Corner with Mansard Roof and Struts - babsjeheron © Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Morse Institute Library Interior Corner – babsjeheron

The integration of the new building with the original building preserved the 1873 walls, windows, rooms and roof in an ingenious way.

This photo taken from inside the top floor of the new library shows one top corner of the original brick building and the actual mansard roof, with struts securing the old building to the new.

Morse Institute Library Interior View Looking Upwards Towards Sky - babsjeheron © Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Morse Institute Library Interior View – babsjeheron

Looking up from the lower level of the new library, you can see the original 1873 wall’s brick and stone facade with joining struts at top.

You can learn more about the history of this interesting library CLICK HERE.
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Thanks to Cee for her CMMC: The Color Blue. Great Blue Herons appear to be blue but the blue color is an illusion created by refraction.
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Thanks to Debbie for her Six Word Saturday: They Are Coming to Get You. The title is the requisite six words long.
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Thanks to Jez for the Water Water Everywhere Challenge. Quite a bit of water today.
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Thanks to Dawn for her Festival of Leaves . Autumn leaves are present in several photos today.
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From Tina Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 173: Interesting Architecture .
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From Patti Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 173: Interesting Architecture .
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From Amy Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 173: Interesting Architecture .

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From Leya Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 173: Interesting Architecture.
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Folks, now that some areas are opening back up, please consider supporting your local Arts communities – whether music, theater, crafts, visual arts venues, and others. All have been impacted over the past year and a half and they need your love more than ever.
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Natick Artists Sidewalk Chalk

Natick Artists Sidewalk Chalk

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Please join Natick Artists TODAY on November 13 on Zoom from 2-5 pm ET for a Virtual Exhibition & Sale. The Natick Artists deferred their scheduled Open Studios until Spring 2022 due to COVID, but didn’t want to wait to see you again. They’re all looking forward to sharing artwork with you in this safe virtual environment. Zoom link: November 13 2-5pm ET
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85739018397?pwd=MDlGbXpPMitTZklERE1oR1ozMmRmZz09

You can learn more about the November 13, 2021, Natick Artists Virtual Exhibition CLICK HERE.

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My brick & mortar presence in Massachusetts dates back to 2009 in several local venues/galleries.

Please watch this space for news of my upcoming Winter 2022 gallery show.

TCAN – The Center for Arts Natick
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Natick Town Hall
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Five Crows Gallery in Natick
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Audubon Sanctuary
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Be a fly on the wall! Please CLICK HERE to see the Great Blue Herons gracing the gallery walls.
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Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

May the Muse be with you.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2003-2021 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, Kayaking, TCAN, Five Crows, Natick

Posted on November 13, 2021, in # Lens-Artists, ardea herodias, Birds, Festival of Leaves, Heron, Nature, Photography, Wildlife Photography and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 34 Comments.

  1. Dear Babsje,
    thanks for sharing the pictures of the Morse Library. We like to visit special libraries. A couple of years ago we went a fortnight to Dublin to visit its famous libraries. Our dear Master worked in the University Library of Uppsala about illuminated manuscripts, in the Stiftsbibliothek of St. Gallen and in Wolfenbüttel, all excellent collections of illuminated manuscripts. Where we are living we have two important libraries not far from us. One is Blickling with one the best collection of early printed books in England and Felbrigg that’s known as the most haunted one. Our Master and Siri 🙂 are ‘library-freaks’.
    Wishing you a great weekend
    The Fab Four of Cley
    🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

    • Many thanks for your thoughtful comment about those superb libraries! I am a fellow library freak. I picked up that affinity at the knee of my mother. The list of libraries you mention in your comment is inspiring. Though not nearly as grand in size or scope as the great libraries of Europe that you mention, the Morse Library is a true gem. I wanted to include many more photos reflecting the ambience, but a librarian was displeased by my photo taking. Who knew they frowned on that?
      Many books are sacred instruments and it is heartening that so many cultures hold them in places of honor.

      Thank you very much. Wishing all The Fab Four of Cley an excellent weekend. 📖 📖 📖 📖 Best, Babsje

  2. what…..no eagles? It’s like a Disney ride Babsje!
    Love the stained glass and I think that Librarian’s glasses are on too tight!

    • Best comment ever, thanks Wayne. Chuckling at the librarian’s glasses being on too tight! That perfectly characterized the situation. Also, regarding the Eagle? Take a look at the headwear on the Native American standing behind the Bison! Best, Babsje

  3. Excellent Babsje. Fierce alligator! I’m glad it’s a statue. Love the brickwork and the stained glass. Superb.

    • Thanks so much. John. I’m glad you liked this one. That statuary menagerie is something else. The first encounter is magical and each time I kayaked that stretch, I noticed something new. And that library is a true gem for a small New England town. Best, Babsje

  4. Beautiful library and I love love love that tunnel view!

    • Many thanks for.your kind compliment, Dawn. I wish the leaves through that tunnel were more vibrant but it is what it is. Thanks for hosting the Festival of Leaves as always! Best, Babsje

  5. What an interesting way to connect old and new – I love that Babsje! Wouldn’t it be nice if more structures were improved this way rather than just destroying the old classics?! Thanks for joining us with this one.

    • Hi Tina. I’m so glad you appreciate how they preserved the old while creating the new. You’re right – so many structures are razed in the name of progress. That’s a shame. Thanks for hosting the fascinating topic this week. Best, Babsje

  6. Love that bridge shot. Simple and dramatic.

    • I’m so glad.you like it. Thanks for.l your kind compliment. It’s fun kayaking that stretch and seeing the big concrete brudge/tunnel give way to the filigree foot bridge further on. Best, Babsje

  7. It’s fantastic that the owners of the property put out water for those enjoying the sights & statuary 👏 The stained glass windows are great but the real winner is your shot through the tunnel to the bridge & autumn trees beyond 😃

    • Hi Jez. I’m pleased that you appreciated this one, thanks for your thoughtful comment. The owners of that menagerie have a fanciful imagination and they are indeed considerate to provide water for the paddlers. I’m especially pleased that you like the photo of the view through the tunnel. Best, Babsje

  8. Love the stained glass, and how some of these are included in the windows – real master pieces. These animals are neat to see too! Thanks for liking my post – enjoy your weekend!

  9. Loved the menagerie and stained glass!

  10. What an interesting post, Babsje. I enjoyed reading and seeing the menagerie along the river. Such a creative thing to do for others to enjoy. My favorite though is looking through the tunnel and seeing the lovely fall leaves!

    • Hi Sylvia! I’m pleased that you like the tunnel view photo the best, it’s one of my favorite scenes on the river. Many thanks for your kind comment. Best, Babsje

  11. Ah, beautiful Babsje! Glad they’re just statues though! The Great Blue Heron poses wonderfully for you!
    Happy Monday and week ahead! xo

  12. Thank you for sharing these beautiful photos!

  13. Beautifully written with excellent photos thank you 🙂👍

  14. Interesting facts and photos, Babsje – thank you! At first I was not sure about the alligator…

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