Category Archives: Fishing

Great Blue Heron’s Salmon Fishing Prequel (Not Art Nbr 17)

© 2018 Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron Fishing at Fish Ladder – babsjeheron

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The Salmon of Doubt

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When last we saw her at the fish ladder, the Great Blue Heron had snared a large Salmon from the base of the torrent.

For more than an hour, she had stalked the Salmon, climbing the fish ladder slowly, intently scanning the pooled water at the base of the dam.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron Catching Large Fish – babsjeheron

The Charles River was in drought conditions, with the usually-robust waterfall at the dam subdued to a trickle. The fish ladder, however, cascaded mightily. The Heron’s wings-akimbo balancing act paid off as she teetered at the edge of the fish ladder long enough to land lunch.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron Has Gone Fishing – babsjeheron

Fortunately for the Great Blue Heron, the ‘no fishing in fish ladder’ policy doesn’t apply to wildlife.
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Thanks to Cee N and WordPress for her Black and White Challenge: Birds.

Thanks again to Erica V and WordPress for the recent WPC: Place in the World. My favorite place in the world is on the water with the beloved Great Blue Herons.
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From May 1 through July 11, 2018, my Great Blue Heron photographs once again grace the walls of the lobby and theater in a free one-woman show at the Summer Street Gallery, of The Center for Arts in Natick. If you’re in the Boston or Metro West area, please stop by to see the Great Blue Herons. As always, many of the photos were taken on the waterways of the Charles River watershed. The gallery is open whenever the box office is open, so please check hours here.
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Through July 13, 2017 I was a Featured Artist at the Five Crows Gallery in Natick, MA. Drop in and see the work of the many wonderfully creative artists who show there when you’re in the area. Five Crows is on FaceBook. To give the gallery a visit, please click here.

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Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2018 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, Kayaking, TCAN, Five Crows

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Epic Great Blue Heron Swallows Ginormous Fish

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

How about a round of applause for this plucky great blue heron?

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Did you guess that the great blue heron was successful in swallowing the fish this time? Guess again.
Note: This is Part 3 of a series of posts.
To catch up, please click here for Part 1, and click here for Part 2.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

She has dropped the fish back into the water once more, and tries to get it into her mouth, at left.
In the next frame, she takes a rest, but notice that she holds the fish under the water with her left foot. After that short break, which lasted 11 seconds according to the timestamp, she tries again.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Her final attempt at swallowing the enormous fish. She pulls it from the water in the first frame, turns closer to the shore in the middle, and at right once again pulls the fish into her mouth. The photo timestamp on the last frame in this photo is 3:59:06. The timestamp on the photo at the top of this post is 3:59:07. It only took one second to flip the fish fully into her mouth. Remarkable.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron after swallowing the ginormous fish. At left, the shape of the fish is visible in the heron’s neck. In the middle frame, the fish has slid farther down, and at right the heron twists her neck to the left and then to the right to hasten the fish’s movement fully down her throat.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

She paused on the shoreline after swallowing the huge fish, and then she wandered further east. Her gait was heavy and slow, her hunger sated for days most likely. I’m not sure how much a 2+ foot-long pike weighs, but safe to say she took in a fair percentage of her own body weight in that single meal.

Eating such a large fish can be deadly for herons. While they often abandon fish that are too large to swallow – which I expected her to do that day – they sometimes swallow fish too huge for their digestive systems to process, which is fatal to both fish and bird.

It was a nature photographer’s dream to capture everything that unfolded that day, and I was thrilled at the outcome: the great blue heron got her fish.

My emotions ran the gamut from excitement (at seeing the heron near the fisherman), to apprehension (at her getting too close to him), to alarm (when he whistled to her and started feeding her baitfish), to protectiveness (when I had to move close myself in case she got tangled in fishing line), to amazement (when she surfaced with that 2+ foot fish), to curiosity (at whether she’d be able to swallow it), to anxiety (about whether any of the photos I was firing off would turn out at all), to happiness for her (when she finally swallowed the fish without choking). It was a roller coaster.

She looked beautiful walking down the shore in the late afternoon sun.

But the question remained: would she survive digesting the fish? There were flashes of dread while I was watching her, wondering if I was witnessing the ultimate cause of her demise.

Would I see her again?

The boathouse closed for the year that weekend. It would be at least seven months before that question would be answered

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Thanks to Ailsa for her Weekly Travel Theme: Still prompt. (When the fisherman tossed the enormous fish to the waiting great blue heron, I gasped, silently. While the heron attempted to eat the fish, I sat stock-still in my kayak, not daring to move lest the heron get spooked and choke on the fish.)

Thanks to Cheri Lucas Rowlands and WordPress for the Weekly Photo Challenge: Grand prompt. She asked for jaw dropping, grand. The great blue heron literally dropped her jaw at the sight of the grand fish being reeled in, and my jaw dropped as the rest of this story unfolded that day.)

Thanks once again to Stewart Monckton for the Wild Bird Wednesday prompt.

Thanks to Sue Llewellyn for her Word A Week Photography Challenge: Shadow challenge. I shadowed the heron for a long time, in order to make sure it wasn’t harmed by the fishing line or hooks. It is not recommended to get so close or feed any wild animals, but this bird was obviously already familiar with fishermen as food sources before that day.

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A selection of my heron and flower photos is now available at the Five Crows Gallery in Natick, MA. Drop in and see the work of the many wonderfully creative artists who show there when you’re in the area.

Five Crows is on FaceBook. To give the gallery a visit, please click here.

Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

(These photos were taken October 7, 2007.)

© 2013 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, Fishing, Kayaking

Great Blue Heron’s Grand Fish Adventure

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron trying to grasp the grand fish.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron uses body English while begging for fish from the fisherman.
(Please click here to read Part 1 of this fish tale if you missed it.)

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron with fishing line flying over it’s head, left.
At right, catching a small bait fish tossed by the fisherman.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron looking beneath the surface to find the large fish tossed to her by
the fisherman. She finds it, grasps it (as seen in the first photo at the top of
this post), then finally comes back up to the surface triumphantly clutching the prize fish.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

She carries the fish down the shore, then washes it in the water before lifting back out.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

She tries to swallow the huge fish, then puts it back in the water before trying again to swallow it.

There are times when a heron tries to eat a fish that is simply too large. When that happens, sometimes the heron gives up, and abandons the fish. Sometimes they don’t. When they don’t, the consequences can be serious, and not just for the fish.

To be continued…

(This post is the second part of a series. If you missed the first part, please click here to read Part 1.)

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Thanks once more to Prairiebirder Charlotte for her Feathers on Friday prompt.

Thanks to Ailsa for her Weekly Travel Theme: Still prompt. (When the fisherman tossed the enormous fish to the waiting great blue heron, I gasped, silently. While the heron attempted to eat the fish, I sat stock-still in my kayak, not daring to move lest the heron get spooked and choke on the fish.)

Thanks to Cheri Lucas Rowlands and WordPress for the Weekly Photo Challenge: Grand prompt. She asked for jaw dropping, grand. The great blue heron literally dropped her jaw at the sight of the grand fish being reeled in, and my jaw dropped as the rest of this story unfolded that day.)

Thanks once again to Stewart Monckton for the Wild Bird Wednesday prompt.

Thanks to Sue Llewellyn for her Word A Week Photography Challenge: Shadow challenge. I shadowed the heron for a long time, in order to make sure it wasn’t harmed by the fishing line or hooks. It is not recommended to get so close or feed any wild animals, but this bird was obviously already familiar with fishermen as food sources before that day.

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A selection of my heron and flower photos is now available at the Five Crows Gallery in Natick, MA. Drop in and see the work of the many wonderfully creative artists who show there when you’re in the area.

Five Crows is on FaceBook. To give the gallery a visit, please click here.

Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

(These photos were taken October 7, 2007.)

© 2013 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, Fishing, Kayaking

Great Blue Heron’s Jaw-Dropping Day with a Fisherman

The great blue heron always gave those other fishermen a wide berth, but this man was different. He was using bait – big-looking silvery bait – and his fishing gear was ample and good.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron’s jaw dropped as the fisherman reeled one in, off camera.

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron foraging not far from a fisherman.

Paddling on to the north, and under the tunnel, I nosed the kayak smoothly, silently into the middle cove, eyes straining hard right to see the alpha heron before before the alpha heron saw me and bolted off.

Then suddenly, a flash of blue-grey to my left – the female, swooping onto the western shore – the same female who had been chased by the alpha a few weeks earlier. The same female who back then chose me as the lesser of the evils.

I watched her foraging along the shore from a respectful distance, not wanting to get too close lest my presence scare her off, anxious about the solo fisherman casting into the cove from his perch along the tunnel overpass.

He wasn’t one of the regulars, the usual happy fishermen and boys who gather on the sloping tunnel sides. I knew the heron always gave those men a wide berth, but this man was different. He was using bait – big-looking silvery bait – and his fishing grear was ample and good.

I felt unease for the heron, but she continued prodding the mud in her corner of the shore, occasionally venturing out into deeper waters five feet or so, stalking what was beneath the surface there, dallying until her interest waned or util the prey moved on.

So it went for 15 minutes or so…

And then she made her move, and strode purposefuly north, until she reached the tunnel.

And the lone fisherman.

I followed behind her, 10 feet back, out of her line of sight, parallel to the shore.

In the past when she reached the tunnel, she would  rise from the water on strong wings, and cross the channel, clearing it and going fully beyond in 3 loping wingstrokes.

Each time I was there, I raised my camera to catch her mid-stroke, framed by the tunnel entrance, and this day was no different.

I got into position, focused across to where I knew her flight path to be, and waited.

… In vain, once more.

This time, she landed short of her usual place on the north shore.

She landed directly in front of the fisherman, directly in the path of his perilous casts!

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron begging for a handout from a fisherman.

I hovered on the left bank, alarmed.

Would he hook her?

Would he accidentally wrap his filament around her throat?

Would she chase after his cast and take his bait fish, swallowing hook, line, and sinker?

I paddled cross the channel and struck up my usual fisherman’s conversation with him, edging closer in to be able to rescue the heron from his line.

“Catching anything?”

“Yes.”

“Good. What’re you sing for bait?”

“Shiners.”

“Great weather for October!”

“Yep.”

He settled back into the rhythm of his fishing.

Heron settled in, watching the baitfish soar out on the end of its tether, occasionally swooping out to pick up the leftovers after he reeled back in.

I settled in to squeeze off photos here and there.

We established a routine, the three of us – me in the middle, 5 feet from him, heron only 4 feet beyond me.

At least, I thought, I could rescue heron if he snagged her or if she bit down onto a hook.

And then I heard it.

Tweeee-eeee-eeet, a wavering whistle.

He was whistling to Heron!

She perked up!

And he tossed a small silvery fish her way.

She lunged and swallowed in one exquisite movement!

And so it went for the next half-hour, he would cast out, and sometimes she followed his lure, sometimes not.

Every 4th or 5th cast, he’d toss a silvery prize her way. She always took his treat and was eager for more…so eager she moved in closer and closer to him, and to me.

Too close for any good camera shots.

What should have been too close for her comfort.

To be continued…

(This post is part of a series. Please click here to read Part 2.)

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Thanks to Paula and WordPress for the Thursday’s Special Non-Challenge Challenge. (This was an amazingly intimate encounter with the great blue heron, and this particular heron is very special to me.)

Thanks to Cheri Lucas Rowlands and WordPress for the Weekly Photo Challenge: Grand prompt. She asked for jaw dropping, grand. The great blue heron literally dropped her jaw at the sight of the grand fish being reeled in.)

Thanks once again to Stewart Monckton for the Wild Bird Wednesday prompt.

Thanks to Sue Llewellyn for her Word A Week Photography Challenge: Shadow challenge. I shadowed the heron for a long time, in order to make sure it wasn’t harmed by the fishing line or hooks. It is not recommended to get so close or feed any wild animals, but this bird was obviously already familiar with fishermen as food sources before that day.

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A selection of my heron and flower photos is now available at the Five Crows Gallery in Natick, MA. Drop in and see the work of the many wonderfully creative artists who show there when you’re in the area.

Five Crows is on FaceBook. To give the gallery a visit, please click here.

Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

(These photos were taken October 7, 2007.)

© 2013 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, Fishing, Kayaking

Jaw-Dropping Wild Egret Fishes Next To Man for 2+ Hours

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

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© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Egret flips a fish prior to swallowing it.

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Thanks to Wordless Wednesday for the Wordless Wednesday challenge.

Thanks to Cheri Lucas Rowlands and WordPress for the Weekly Photo Challenge: Grand prompt. She asked for jaw dropping, grand. The fisherman literally did a jaw-dropped double-take when joined by the egret, as did I. It was a grand experience in watching inter-species “trust” unfold.

Thanks once again to Stewart Monckton for the Wild Bird Wednesday prompt.

Thanks to Sue Llewellyn for her Word A Week Photography Challenge: Shadow challenge. The egret shadowed the fisherman for more than 2 hours that afternoon. It is not recommended to feed any wild animals, but this bird was obviously already versed in fishermen as food sources before that day.

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A selection of my heron and flower photos is now available at the Five Crows Gallery in Natick, MA. Drop in and see the work of the many wonderfully creative artists who show there when you’re in the area.

Five Crows is on FaceBook. To give the gallery a visit, please click here.

Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

(These photos were taken Asugust 19, 2013.)

© 2013 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Egret,Fishing

Great Blue Heron Using Wings for Wordless Saturday

© Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great blue heron hover fishing – high wings cast a shadow over the water to lure fish.

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Thanks to the kind folks at NaBloPoMo for the National Blog Posting Month challenge this November. (Today is the final day of NaBloPoMo, so congrats to all who participated by posting every day during November,)

Thanks once again to Stewart Moncton for the Wild Bird Wednesday prompt.

Thanks to Ailsa for the Weekly Travel Theme: Sky. (The heron reaches for the sky with wings to create shadows on the water’s surface, then stands stock still until the fish are tricked by the shadows.)

Thanks also to Sue for the Word a Week Challenge: High. (Holding wings high casts shadows on the water that lure in the fish, they fall for it repeatedly.)

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A selection of my heron and flower photos is now available at the Five Crows Gallery in Natick, MA. Drop in and see the work of the many wonderfully creative artists who show there when you’re in the area.

Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

The Tao of Feathers™

(This photo was taken July 22, 2007.)

© 2013 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blie Heron, Hover Fishing

Dinner and Photo Op are Served – Daily Prompt: Served, Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside, and Cee’s Color White

The egret skulked stealthily closer and closer, unseen by the fisherman on the shore until the last minute.

Egret lunging from the shore to catch a fish.

Egret lunging from the shore to catch a fish.

The fisherman and the egret stared at each other. Clearly, the fisherman was the more surprised of the two.

He didn’t miss a beat, though, following through on the cast he had just played out with a flick of his wrist.

Soundlessly, he reeled in a small fish, and as though guided by instinct, he unhooked it and tossed it back…

Back Into the waters directly in front of the egret, who lunged after it in an explosion of white, wings-akimbo, feathers flying.

Egret flips fish into her bill.

Egret flips fish inside her bill.

Nature presents us with scenes of exquisite beauty.

When it comes to wildlife photography, so many of those experiences are never caught with a camera. Wildlife is shy and fast and elusive and unpredictable. Weather conditions don’t always cooperate. Digital film cards fill up at inopportune moments. Lens caps left on the camera inadvertently cause missed shots. Sunlight can be too bright or too dim. Insensitive gawkers scare off the wild creatures. I could go on and on.

On this day, however, the universe conspired with the egret and fisherman and served up a tasty morsel for the egret, and an unexpected photo opportunity for me there along the shoreline.

It was thrilling to watch these two interacting, fishing man and fishing bird. How I wants to be fishing with them, fish fishing instead of camera fishing. How I wanted a fish, myself, to toss to the egret like the fisherman, who was practicing catch and release. How I wanted to know the feeling of the bird coming to me for a fish, the way Border Collie Rogue gambols up for a Milk Bone at the boathouse.

Just once.

But that would be wrong.

As the Wildlife Code of Ethics says, “Never feed or leave food (baiting) for wildlife. Habituation due to handouts can result in disease or even death of that animal and injury to you.”

Which brings me back around to catch and release fishing. I’m sure that for as long as man has been trying to catch fish throughout the millennia, opportunistic birds have been trying to get man’s leftovers. Is there ever a fishing trawler that pulls into port without a flock of birds trailing along after it’s stern? How about the gulls circling and lurking above the sea walls up and down our coasts where anglers try their luck? It’s not the fishermen’s fault – the birds are very smart.

There is a socialization between man and wild bird that has been taking place for eons, whether we’re aware of it or not, whether we like it or not. Speaking for myself, I’m not sure I like it. I am disheartened when I hear photographers talk about how tame the birds are in such-and-such a place and encourage others to come on down to see the tame birds up close.

There in the cove that day, I felt torn. While the photographer that I am was thrilled by the photo op served up, I felt heartbroken to see this magnificent egret so very tame. It wasn’t the fisherman’s fault – I’m sure that egret has been panhandling fish for a long time. The egret has been lucky so far, but the risk of being snagged by a wayward fishhook from a poorly-cast line is real. The risk of being entangled in fishing line is very real, as I blogged in The Taxi Driver’s Tale.

And so I love this gorgeous, graceful egret as an artist loves all of her models, but I can’t help thinking: wild birds needs to be just that to survive safely.

Wild.

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Thanks to Michelle W. and WordPress for both the Daily Prompt nudge and for the Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside prompt.

Thanks also to Cee Neuner and WordPress for the Cee’s Fun Photo Challenge: White and Purple nudge.

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(This took place August 19, 2013)

© 2013 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Where’s My Captain? – Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside and Sunday Stills: Boats

Everybody, listen to me, and return me, my ship
I’m your captain, I’m your captain…

Mark Farner, Grand Funk Railroad

There were no great blue heron sightings that day at the lake, and apparently not enough humans, as well.

There were no great blue heron sightings that day at the lake, and apparently not enough humans, as well – at least not inside this captainless inflatable boat.

I have taken some liberties with the topic of this week’s Photo Challenge “Inside.” As you can see, this photo shows “NOT Inside,” instead.

While I’m being a bit playful with words here, what happened that day on the lake could have been tragic. The captain bounced out of his boat without having his kill-switch tether attached, and so his boat circled endlessly until the fire department ran the boat aground.

Fortunately, no one was injured in this incident, but not all similar incidents have had happy endings.

Click here to learn more from the US Coast Guard Boating Safety Resource Center.

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Thanks to Michelle and WordPress for the Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside nudge, and to Ed for the Sunday Stills: Boats challenge.

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(This took place May 19, 2013)

© 2013 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

I Spy with my False Eye — Daily Prompt: The Artist’s Heron’s Eye

The catfish was small as catfish go – less than a foot – but she was crafty, and swished her way deeper under the cover of vegetation lining the shore.

But she was no match for the great blue heron, who swooped in with that stiletto beak and speared the catfish through, the yellow beak tip protruding in stark contrast to the dark fish skin.

Great blue heron washing a fresh-caught catfish, showing false eye on each shoulder.

Great blue heron washing a fresh-caught catfish, showing false eye (aka eyespot) on each shoulder.

Herons often “clean” their prey before swallowing, and this was no exception. As the heron flew-hopped further out into the shallows, I could see why: the catfish was wrapped in a large oak leaf, stirred up from the muck along the shore.

What followed was epic. The heron dunked the catfish beneath the surface and quickly dispatched the oak leaf debris. The heron then dipped the catfish again under the water, bringing it up to maneuver into swallowing position. The catfish squirmed, and flopped, and swished in the heron’s beak. The heron again lowered the catfish under the water and brought it back up again. And again. And again.This went on for nearly half an hour.

I have watched herons try to subdue catfish before, and each time the catfish has prevailed. This day was no exception, as on a final attempt at submerging and then retrieving the catfish, the heron came up empty beaked. He scoured the area with first his beak and then foot, to no avail.

Later that night, looking at the photos from that session, I noticed something I’d never realized before: the “shoulder patches” of dark feathers (that adult herons develop as a secondary sex characteristic) form the same kind of “false eye” or “eyespot” that certain moths, butterflies, and even fishes have. Look at the photo above, and you can see those eyes while the heron has his head and neck dipped far down. One theory around eyespots in other creatures is that they help protect against predators. I’m not aware of anyone applying that same theory to herons before, but I think the eyespots could have the same protective role – although a heron’s beak and clawed toes are formidable weapons, when a heron is fishing, it is in a very vulnerable position. Just as with moths, then, their false eyes might make the herons appear less vulnerable.

So, as they say, that’s my story theory and I’m sticking to it.

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Thanks for the Daily Prompt nudge, Michelle W and WordPress.
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(This took place May 17, 2009)

© 2013 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

The One that Didn’t Get Away – Weekly Photo Challenge: Curves

When the great blue heron resurfaced, her prize catch struggled mightily, the curve of its back straining left then right, scales and fins glistening.

The man in the hip waders put finger to his lips in the universal gesture of “ssssshhhh.”

I rounded the peninsula with smooth feathered strokes, and gave him wide berth. His casting looked slow and measured, with a little flourish as the fly arced out over the lake.

Fish were jumping that day, but not for him.

The green folding boat 20 yards away was having little better luck at fishing.

Across the lake, the tall wading bird plied the shore leisurely, biding her time.

Soon the flycaster in the silly hat would give up.

Soon the green boat would motor back through the channel to the lower lake.

Soon the cove would be hers.

Soon the fish that got away from Men, would be hers.

We waited together, she and I.

I let her take the lead, and soon enough she did.

Taking long purposeful strides, she passed the turtles lazing on the log, and parted the reeds.

Up and over the half-submerged pine trunk she climbed, all the while stalking something beneath the surface.

She stopped.

For more than 5 minutes she stood stock still in water up to her hips. She stared just offshore with an unceasing focus.

The only movement was a slight tilt to her head, first to the left, and then an almost imperceptible extending of her neck, up up higher higher until she was staring straight down.

Great blue heron landing large pike.

Great blue heron landing large pike.

Whoosh, as arrow beak pierced the surface, and her body lunged fully beneath the surface, energy exploding into water. Massive blue-grey wings half-unfurled broke the surface, rippling body muscles straining between wings and water.

How long she was under, I cannot say, I lost track of time, but when she resurfaced, her prize catch struggled mightily, the curve of its back straining left then right, scales and fins glistening. It was an epic fight.

And when she struggled to shore under the weight of her prey, I’m not sure whose eyes held more surprise — mine, hers, or the one that didn’t get away.
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Thanks to Sara Rosso at WordPress for the inspiration of this Weekly Photo Challenge!
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 (This took place October 7, 2007)

© 2013 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

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