OOPS! Beautiful Great Blue Heron Misses the Landing (Not Art Nbr 30)

Great Blue Heron misses her landing and does a faceplant in a pine tree - babsjeheron   © Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron misses the landing and does a faceplant in a pine tree – babsjeheron

A simple miscalculation, and the Great Blue Heron landed with his head thrust beneath the green, beak agape, eyes wide with protective membrane in place.

I would love to have the talent to fly and soar and wheel on the winds like the birds, but, lacking feathers, enough about me.

He launched from the limb that overhung the water in a sudden burst of energy, one wing stroke followed by more in rapid succession.

His wings pulled outward, forward, fully extended, then back in another burst bringing him to the tip of the pine bough.

His birdness revealed itself as feet reached forward to grasp the branch, all the while wings fluttered to help him hover into position. To and fro they rapidly fanned the air as he eased into position.

The green needled bough sunk under the force of his landing, and for a moment he teetered there, on the edge of his feathers aching for balance.

And suddenly he disappeared!

No, wait, there he is… face down on the soft pine.

Great Blue Heron does a faceplant when trying to land in a pine tree - babsjeheron   © Babsje (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron does a faceplant when trying to land in a pine tree – babsjeheron

A simple miscalculation, and he landed with his head thrust beneath the green, beak agape, eyes wide with protective membrane in place.

Suspense and anxiety were palpable, as I watched his hovering-balancing. His wings at first stretched out flat on the surface, then retracted back and up, and within seconds he was upright and preening once again.

I have never before seen a Heron look so utterly birdlike, and so vulnerable, as in those few seconds. One look, and you could see what binds Herons with both Hummingbird and Hawk.

And you could see that sometimes even beautiful Herons can benefit from practice…and being mindful.

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Cee Neuner and the creative and inspiring Lens Artists Tina, Amy, Patti, and Leya all encourage the community of photographers and writers. Please click the links below to see the beautiful offerings from these wonderful photographers.

The focus for this week’s Lens Artist challenge hosted by Ann-Christine is “One Image One Story.”

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Thanks to Cee for her Hunt for joy. I don’t know if this challenge is still on, but I really like the idea of searching for joy. This Heron has brought great joy.
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From Tina Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 176: One Image, One Story .
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From Patti Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 176: One Image, One Story .
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From Amy Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 176: One Image, One Story .

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From Leya Lens Artists Weekly Photo Challenge 176: One Image, One Story.
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Folks, now that some areas are opening back up, please consider supporting your local Arts communities – whether music, theater, crafts, visual arts venues, and others. All have been impacted over the past year and a half and they need your love more than ever.
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Natick Center Cultural District logo

Natick Center Cultural District

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The Natick Center Cultural District is situated in a friendly, classic New England town hosting a vibrant, contemporary fusion of art, culture and business. Learn more!

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My brick & mortar presence in Massachusetts dates back to 2009 in several local venues/galleries.

Please watch this space for news of my upcoming Winter 2022 gallery show.

TCAN – The Center for Arts Natick
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Natick Town Hall
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Five Crows Gallery in Natick
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Audubon Sanctuary
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Be a fly on the wall! Please CLICK HERE to see the Great Blue Herons gracing the gallery walls.
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Remember: Walk softly and carry a long lens.™

May the Muse be with you.™

The Tao of Feathers™

© 2003-2021 Babsje. (https://babsjeheron.wordpress.com)

Great Blue Heron, Kayaking, TCAN, Five Crows, Natick

Posted on November 30, 2021, in # Lens-Artists, ardea herodias, Birds, Great Blue Heron, Heron, Inspiration, Mindfulness, Nature, Photo Essay, Photography, Wildlife Photography and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 48 Comments.

  1. Practice makes perfect, yet these creatures even with small miscalculations, are perfect! 😉
    Happy Tuesday, my dear Babsje! 🌻😘

  2. It can happen to the best of us. Wonderful series!

  3. I have seen Eagles screw up landings as well Babsje! Sooner or later everything on this planet screws up………hopefully it’s not a significant mistake!

    • Hi Wayne. Thanks for your great comment. It’s difficult to envision your Eagle friends Romeo and The Daredevil being anything less that graceful and on target with their landings! I bet you’ve held off on posting their foibles? Best, Babsje

      • Eagles know of these forest tunnels in their territory. If they grab a fish and another Eagle wants it there will be a chase! The chasing Eagle does not know the sharp twist and turns as well. I have seen two Eagles enter on two occasions and only one come out! On one of those chases I heard a loud crashing sound! I went around the island in my boat and waited for the Eagle to hop out and sure enough It did!
        I’ve also seen Eagles try to perch on a spot they’ve never perched on before and have to lift off suddenly as It could not take their weight!

  4. I have only ever seen herons looking calm, graceful and utterly competent. What a unique moment you’ve captured!

    • Hi Chrissie! Thanks so much for your kind compliment. It was definitely unexpected to see this un-graceful landing attempt. I’ve only seen that happen once and was lucky to be in the right place at the right time with a camera in hand. Best, Babsje

  5. Oh dear, how embarrassing. Hope you pretended not to see.

    • Giggling at your astute comment! Actually the Heron stood upright, looked me square in the eye, took a bow and then exclaimed “I meant to do that!!” Wouldn’t you? Best, Babsje

  6. Great series, Babsje – imperfect and still perfect!

  7. Whoa…I’m had the pines were soft.
    I have to admit I relate to that heron–so easy to miscalculate when you are out and about!😧😧

  8. LOL babsje – something we don’t often see! Usually they are SO graceful as them float down onto the branches, wings extended. You caught a marvelous moment there!

    • Hi Tina. Thanks! You can say that again! They are usually so graceful and composed. It was fun to see a Great Blue step out of character. Definitely out of it’s comfort zone! Glad you like this one. Best, Babsje

  9. Ooooooops indeed! No one said flying is easy!

  10. Ah yes…we can all benefit from practice. I wonder if it was too branchy. lol. Still nice story to go with it’s journey. Donna

  11. Sorry, I’m late to reply, Babsje. Great capture of the landing!

  12. “I would love to have the talent to fly and soar and wheel on the winds like the birds, but, lacking feathers”
    The solution is a glider flight. There are a few places where a person can take a 45-60 minute glider flight. At one time, a local glider company gave glider flights in between giving flight lessons. Their flight lessons was how it was taught – first, a healthy respect for flying with glider flights before moving into powered flight with a Piper Cub or some other light aircraft. This is how they teach cadets at the AF Academy how to fly.
    The faceplant landing, the GBH wasn’t the least bit embarrassed about not sticking the landing.

    • Hi David. Thanks for your kind comments! You’re right – the Heron had no sense of embarrassment about his faceplant. And you’re also right about glider flight. My old boss when I lived and worked in Sunnyvale years ago was a glider pilot. Oh the stories Ian would tell. I started and then stopped private pilot lessons years back when the training plane was a pterodactyl. And. now I’m unable to fly at all – defibrillators don’t like being at altitude. I have fond memories though. Best, Babsje

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